The Churches

JUNE SERVICES:

4th                       11.00am                    Holy Communion                                                  Great Massingham

11th                      10.30am                   Group Holy Communion                                     Great Massingham

18th                     09.30am                   Holy Communion                                                 Little Massingham

18th                      11.00am                   Family Service                                                       Great Massingham

25th                     11.00am                   Holy Communion                                                  Great Massingham

JULY SERVICES:

2nd                      11.00am                   Holy Communion                                                  Great Massingham

 

Benefice Prayer Meeting, Sunday 4th June, 3pm, at Congham and 2nd July at Ashwicken

For more news please visit our benefice website at www.ggmbenefice.uk

 


CHURCH NEWS:

 

Music in Country Churches 2017

St. Mary’s will be privileged to host another concert from the “Music in the Country Churches” to be held on the 25 & 26th of July.      There will be lots  to do and we will require stewards & sponsors please.  If interested please contact Margaret on 520135.

Wednesday Teas

From Wednesday 5th of April the afternoon teas will begin again at St. Mary’s from 3pm  to 4.30pm

Produce Stall
Will return in 2017

Church Cleaning
This takes place every Saturday from 10am.

Churchyard

We are hoping to get a working party together to tackle some of the clearance jobs in the churchyard. It would be good if we had offers of help just on a casual basis.
If you are willing to help, even for just an hour to two, then please let me have your name and telephone number and I will try to co ordinate a suitable date and time even if just to allocate some tasks to be done at your convenience.

Stephen Hudson


Vicar’s Letter for Flamin’ June

The sound of Mendelssohn’s Wedding March will soon be echoing around our villages – it’s June, although perhaps not flamin’ June as I write but certainly the start of the main wedding season. They say ‘if you marry in June you’re a bride all your life, and the bridegroom who marries in June gets a sweetheart for a wife.’ Well, there may not be seven brides for seven brothers this year but it’s just as exciting for all those involved in planning a wedding. People are still choosing to ‘tie the knot’ in church, making solemn promises in the eyes of God and in front of the gathered congregation, despite competition from alternatives like all-in-one wedding and reception venues.

Vows of love made in public are always extremely moving and it’s a joy and privilege to be alongside couples at this important time in their lives. We consider the different qualities of love: such as patience, kindness, trust and forbearance, truthfulness; and the cost of loving someone -because love always comes at a cost. So in June, love is in the air and it would be good to keep this uppermost in our minds as we are all drawn to other more turbulent events, less joyful perhaps but certainly emotionally charged. I’m thinking of the General Election.

Many people are anxious and disturbed by the challenging, uncharted political territory in which we find ourselves regardless of how we voted in the referendum or plan to vote on Thursday June 8th. Love in all its complexity is conspicuously absent from the political arena, especially during election campaigns, and yet, we need it so much.

Our Archbishops Justin and John have written an open pastoral letter to the whole country, available to read in its entirety on the Church of England website. In it they urge us to take inspiration from the ancient Christian values of love, trust and hope, while playing our part in these troubled times with generosity and kindness: ‘the season of Easter invites us to celebrate and renew our love of God and our love of our neighbour, our trust and hope in God and in each other.’

Some people think that the Church should never speak out nor involve itself in politics; but being the established Church, church and state are inextricably entwined in our Monarch, Queen Elizabeth II, Defender of the Faith and Head of State. She offers us a perfect example of loving, prayerful service to all her people without exception, whatever they choose to vote on June 8th. My love and prayers to you all – and for our country.

Yours in Christ, Judith


Who does the Church belong to? We have recently been successful in our bid for Heritage Lottery Grant Funding for urgent repair works to one of our church buildings; congratulations East Walton! One of the questions on the HLF application form is: ‘Who owns the building?’ We didn’t actually have to answer this as for churches it’s N/A – not applicable!

So who does the Church belong to? Well, that is an interesting question. The Church (meaning a body of people who meet together regularly) belongs to those who are part of it. The Church is a family or a fellowship. However, it’s not true to say the Church belongs only to those who use it because the Churches belong to the communities in which they are set.

In essence, your parish church belongs to you, in a very special way. The Church of England offers services – not only regular services (of all styles) every week throughout the year but also for special occasions and those most important moments in our lives. The Church has been there for everyone for generations and has baptised, married and buried parishioners, being available not just to those who regularly worship at church on a Sunday but to all parishioners.

There are also important celebrations at special times of the year that many people from our parishes enjoy – Easter, Christmas and Remembrance Sunday – to name just a few. And it’s not just about church services, the Church can and does offer much more. The Church is there for its community to offer support to everyone within the geographical parish and the Rector or Vicar is available to everyone. The Church is also a very special place where anyone can come to find a few moments of peace, solitude and solace. It’s also good to remember just how much churches have contact in their communities.

Our work in schools is just one of the ways that church meets community and shows our face to the world. We live in a time when, sadly, many people are turning away from the church. I think it is so important that our younger generation grow up with the knowledge that the Church is here for them and always will be at any time in their lives should they wish to turn to it for friendship or support. The Church has, and will continue, to provide a place for everyone – young, old and in between and we look forward to serving you for a long time to come. After all what is the Church here for? Only a couple of weeks ago we celebrated Easter.

I have in my mind a picture of that man, Jesus, who hangs on a cross with arms outstretched, symbol of the love God has for all humankind and a constant reminder to me that the Church, and particularly your Parish Church, is not just for ‘the chosen few’ but for all of you out there! Who does the church belong to? I

t belongs to you – because you belong.

With love, Revd Jane


An Easter Message

The German theologian, Dietrich Bonhöffer, once wrote: “The Christian is not a ‘religious person’ but simply a human being, as Jesus was, a human being profoundly this-worldly, characterised by discipline and the constant knowledge of death and resurrection.” Death and resurrection; death is not the end. This quotation reminds us that Easter is as much about life before death as about what happens when we die. Our attention is drawn to the here and now and what matters to us in this world.

Think of those occasions when we have felt truly alive, tinglingly ‘recalled to life’. It may be through a stirring piece of music or a walk in the countryside on a beautiful Spring day, or a new friendship or reading something inspirational. There is a quickening of the spirit, a sense of renewal. These instances can be seen as part of God’s resurrection at work in our lives. Conversely, there will be other occasions, significantly to us personally, when hope is absent, when all seems bleak, dead and buried.

We may have lost our way or had a dream crushed or been let down; something inside us shrivels and dies. This is when we enter a bleak landscape without hope and former things no longer hold the significance they once did. But then things begin to change, perhaps over a period of time and we begin to breathe again.

This is a glimpse of resurrection too. For resurrection has to be preceded by a kind of death – a dying of old habits perhaps which prevent us living life to the full. That’s the discipline bit that Bonhöffer refers to – getting through each day, keeping on keeping on. We are all human, we are ‘this-worldly’, we all fall short of perfection!

There was once an eminent doctor, a heart surgeon, who employed a gardener. The surgeon was an atheist, the gardener a devout Christian and sometimes they would have discussions about God. “You know,” said the surgeon, “I have cut open many human hearts in my time but I’ve never found a soul inside.” “Indeed,” said the gardener, “and do you know : while digging in your garden I have sliced through many a daffodil bulb in the soil but I’ve never found a daffodil inside!” Do you remember that lovely old hymn? “There is a green hill far away without a city wall, where the dear Lord was crucified who died to save us all.”

At Eastertide we can rejoice in the new life and hope that Jesus brings. Living in faith and in hope of resurrection, we are an Easter people and Alleluia is our song.

I wish you all a very happy Easter, Reverend Judith

 


Light and Life With February gone, the cold dark winter months are behind us at last! How we have longed (well I have) for the warmer days of Spring bringing with them light and new life. But it seems to me that it’s not only the weather that has been cold and dark lately.

The world seems to be a more unstable and darker place than ever before. We are witnessing massive movements of people around the world, continuing wars in the Middle East, terrorist acts and threats, Brexit and now, to cap it all, Donald Trump! What on earth does the future hold for us? We all long for a brighter, safer future for ourselves, for our families, our children, grandchildren and indeed for the whole world. But there is so much uncertainty and insecurity. Is this something new, or has it always been like this?

The world has been through troubling times before and come out the other side but now, somehow, the stakes seem so much higher. Donald Trump has been described as ‘the most powerful man on earth’ – heaven help the world! I offer you some thoughts to reflect upon this month as we travel through Lent.

Lent covers the weeks running up to the poignancy of Maundy Thursday and the pain of Good Friday before the joyful celebration of Easter Day. Lent is a good time to slow down and ‘take stock’. Christmas has long gone but back in Jesus’ day – the first Christmas – life was pretty difficult then too. The people were surrounded by soldiers, crushed and oppressed by a new and Mighty Power – the Romans. Everyday life was a struggle for ordinary people and the future must have seemed bleak. Into that uncertainty came Jesus – quietly and almost unnoticed – well it’s true, a handful of shepherds noticed and a few wise men from the East – but practically everybody else missed this world changing event. The arrival of the ‘Light of the World’ – come to save the world – bringing light and new life.

The mighty power of God at work on earth! There is no greater power than this and Jesus’ power is still alive. It is a different kind of power, it is not power over people but the power to love all people and help them to love one another ‘as He has first loved us’. Jesus came to show us a different way; a way based on love, peace and justice for all; and if the world is to be a brighter and safer place for all of us to live in then perhaps His Way is the one to try. It’s not easy – but then He never said it would be!

Some final words in a famous quote from G K Chesterton to ponder on this month: “The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting; it has been found difficult, and left untried”. Much Love, Revd Jane

 


The Hope of Spring and the Generosity at the Heart of Community. What a joy it is to see snowdrops, fair maids of February, pushing up through the dark earth, heralding the hope of Spring. I love snowdrops; when my son Luke was born a friend gave me a little bunch of snowdrops, the first flowers of the New Year.

As I write, we are still in the Church Season of Epiphany, when we celebrate Baby Jesus, the Christ-child, being revealed to all nations, as symbolised by the Three Wise Men paying homage, having journeyed from distant lands. Does this evoke in us any thoughts of today’s world? Many people are still undertaking long, perilous journeys to find hope for their future.

At the end of January we commemorated Holocaust Memorial Day – genocide is still present in our broken world. We really need the light and hope of the Christ-child in our hearts at the moment.

Many of you will have already heard about the theft of lead from the roof of St. Andrew’s Church, Little Massingham – the third time it has happened there. Several of the churches in our Benefice, especially in isolated locations, have been targeted. Some people think that this is a victimless crime. They couldn’t be more wrong. The whole community is affected, churchgoers and non-churchgoers alike. It is a time to come together in mutual support and fellowship. We have a duty of care as custodians of our magnificent medieval churches – in Norfolk we have about 670, that is a higher density of such churches per head of the population, than anywhere in the world.

Wherever you look you’ll see a church tower beckoning you across the countryside. What do our churches mean to us? Many people value their architecture, their beauty and heritage. Others appreciate their special atmosphere, their stillness and tranquility where, over the centuries, Christians have joined together to worship God: ‘thin places’ where heaven and earth meet. However, the church building is only part of it – it’s the people who complete and make the church, both in the wider community and the worshipping congregation, who offer hospitality and gifts in kind, who provide sanctuary, who look after both one another and the fabric of the building. We have been given a huge task to nurture and maintain our churches – buildings and people – to form a Church fit for the 21st century – whatever that looks like!

If our communities come together in this we will win. There will always be setbacks, great and small. Our Medieval churches will be standing long after we are not. Huge thanks to all who have helped magnificently in our latest crisis – you all know who you are. The prompt and invaluable support the church received from the wider community prevented rainwater from getting in – and the sun shone at the crucial point! It could have been so much worse.

So all we’ve got to do now is to find the money to replace the roof. Hallelujah anyway! With every blessing – and deep gratitude, Reverend Judith

 


Christmas – Bring it on!

I don’t know if you’ve seen Tesco’s Christmas Advert showing on our TV screens at the moment featuring Ruth Jones, Ben Miller and Slade’s, ‘Merry Christmas’ where the ‘lady shopper’ is daunted by the thought of getting ready for Christmas – and it’s only mid November! Well, as I write this in mid-November, I know just how she feels! So many Carol Services to plan and prepare for as well as all the special things that happen in our churches and villages in December – all this and more – and ‘normal life’ doesn’t stop because it’s Christmas. I admit to feeling a little daunted. I suspect there are many of you who feel the same with thinking of all the shopping, planning and preparing to be done over the next few weeks. And yet, like the character in the advert, we too can pause, take a deep breath, look afresh, see the joy, love and hope in Christmas (not necessarily the mince pies!) and say to ourselves; Yeah – Bring it on! Christmas is such a special time of year with candle lit churches, family fun, children laughing. There is an abundance of good things coming up for us all to enjoy – including the mince pies. Christmas is full of love and joy and hope and new beginnings. It is the beginning of the Christian story when God, because he so loved the world, sent His son to earth to live among us and show us the right way to be – to live. That, when we take it seriously, is life changing. It is the beginning of the churches’ new-year and it heralds the New Year to come. It is a time when we can all pause for a while from our normal routines and amidst the tinsel, wrapping paper, turkey and trimmings, reflect upon the potential and possibilities that lie ahead. So let’s not be daunted – let’s turn around together and say, ‘Bring it on!’ And remember that this child we celebrate every Christmas time, born in controversy, threatened by kings, would forever change the course of human history. His story is our story. He can transform our lives too. So will you embrace him as the most wonderful and life changing gift that we can ever receive? I promise you it will take you until eternity to unwrap His treasures. I pray that your Christmas this year will be full of Joy and Love and Hope for the future.

Every blessing, Rev’d Jane.


Advent, the start of the new Church Year, when we begin to look forward to the birth of Jesus at Christmas (ten weeks away as I write) falls in November, towards the end of the calendar year. Endings and new beginnings: our life consists of these, rolling out across the years. We like to mark such landmark occasions, pivots on which we hang our lives. We aspire to look forward in hope, although this can sometimes be quite a challenge – when life surprises or overwhelms us; and politically, due to Brexit, we could not live in more uncertain, uncharted times. However, the time around Remembrance Sunday (13th November) is familiar territory, when we look back at our nation’s history in respect and gratitude, remembering the courage of the past and the heroes who have given us the freedoms we continue to be thankful for to this day. We live in a world of tremendous upheaval and darkness; never has the inextinguishable light of the Christ-child – and the hope He brings us – been more needed in our world. We continue to commemorate the Centenary of the First World War. The Bible Society, in conjunction with the Royal British Legion, has produced a small collection of psalms, poetry, prayers and hymns: Hear My Cry, subtitled ‘words for when there are no words.’ I quote from the books foreword, words written not by a priest but by a decorated soldier, General the Lord Dannatt: “God does not take sides between countries. However, he is passionately concerned for the people who live in those countries and get caught up in war. He made us. He loves us and wants us to love him in return. In peace or war, God is interested in us as individuals.” I echo these words. This Remembrance-tide let us offer our prayers for our serving military personnel and their families, for those challenged by life-changing injuries and for those who have lost their lives in war (including civilians) during the past year: at the going down of the sun and in the morning we will remember them. We also pray that peace and justice will prevail in Syria, especially in the city of Aleppo – and all the countries of the Middle East. Wishing you all a blessed and peaceful Advent, Reverend Judith


What is it?
What is this thing we call church? You may think that a silly question (especially com-ing from the vicar!) You would probably answer, ‘we can all recognise a church when we see it thank you – it’s an old stone building with a tower, stained glass windows, and uncomfortable seats!’ And you would be right if I had asked about a church – but what is ‘Church’.
To be Church there has to be people. Without people the buildings are just a set of his-torical artefacts with varying degrees of architectural merit.
People, and that means you and me, are absolutely central to the Church. I can prove it! Spell out the word Church – C H U R C H. What is in the middle? Answer: you are! Yes, I know that is silly too – but it does make a serious point. You really are the heart of the Church. Without you, it just doesn’t exist and all the buildings in the world won’t change that!
And there’s more! What’s at the beginning and end of Church. Answer: CH CH for, of course, Christ. Jesus is at the beginning and the end, the alpha and omega. He is the beginning and end of the whole world and he is the beginning and end of the Church. Without Jesus there would be no Church.
That’s it really; that’s the Church – you and Jesus. Yes, the buildings are great and we love them, but, always remember it’s the people who matter.
And what matters most to people? I would suggest it is family. So what’s the point of a church without family!
The family is the basic unit of society and of the Church. It is in the family that we first learn to communicate and it is where we learn good from bad. It is in the family that we learn what love is because that is where we first receive love. It is also where we learn how to forgive. It is in the family that we learn to value ourselves and others. Families provide safe havens for each member to flourish and unfold their giftedness. Each one learns from the other how to be caring, loving, resourceful, responsible, giving and hopeful for life. Families support one another, cry together, laugh together and have fun together.
For all of these reasons the Church identifies itself as a family reflecting what the church is – a community of faith, hope and love where we celebrate, pray, laugh and cry togeth-er – and have fun together too! Families are made up of people of all ages – young and old and in-between – and there is something for everyone in our church family!
Why not come along to one of our services or family activities where you will discover a warm welcome because you are part of this family. Come and discover the love, joy, care and support of your family – the Church.

Much love, Rev’d Jane


The 4th Commandment – Take a break!

July beckons and warm weather and school holidays encourage us to take a break, to slow down and refresh for the autumn term ahead of us. We all need to take time out in order to be able to give of our best when we are back at school or work, paid or voluntary.

In fact, God commands us to do it! The Ten Commandments in the Bible’s Old Testament are often thought of as a list of negatives, things not to do. And it’s true there is a list of ‘do nots’ – things like: You must not commit murder. You must not steal. You must not give false evidence against your neighbour. But there are positive instructions too: the ‘dos’ rather than the ‘do nots’ and these seem to me specifically about building positive relationships between us and God and with one another (i.e. respect your father and mother), although, arguably, trying hard to keep all the ten commandments will help strengthen that bond.

There is one commandment that seems quite a gift to us, especially as we move into the holiday season – the 4th Commandment: ‘observe the Sabbath and keep it holy …. You have six days in which to do your work, but the seventh is a day of rest …’. God is recognising our need to take time out. He’s also suggesting we use that time to strengthen our understanding and relationship with Him. It’s a gift of time from God to us. Simple to read; hard to do. Yet we do need, in our busy, hectic lives, that special time out. Sometimes it’s referred to as ‘Sabbathing’. Maybe that’s a helpful expression for those of us who can’t make that time out on a Sunday but do need to find it sometime. A regular slot for resting in God. Letting God’s peace and calm into our rush and bustle.

So my prayer for this holiday season is that each and every one of us might find that special time when we can stop all those things we think we just have to do – but maybe don’t really – and just rest with God. Jesus encouraged his community to keep the Sabbath, although it’s fair to say he wasn’t afraid to use his gifts to help others on that day. But he did support one day in the week for God, a day not to work per se but to be as a community, as a family. The church is not the Vicar or the Ministry Team or indeed the building.

The Church is a family and it is the community. Whatever you do this summer I hope you find time for ‘Sabbathing’ – special times of rest and refreshment and fun with your family and with your community. Have a great summer. Much Love Rev’d Jane


90 Glorious Years!
Our monarch Queen Elizabeth II celebrated her 90th birthday on April 21st but she also has an ‘official birthday’ which, this year, will be on Saturday June 11th. This tradition originates from 1748, the reign of King George II, whose actual birthday fell in chilly November. King George inaugurated a military cavalcade for his armed forces which always took place in the summer months to take advantage of the (hopefully) sunny weather. This cavalcade evolved to also become a celebration of the monarchy, a tradition which continues to the present day.
Modern celebrations of our armed forces’ parade ground prowess are rightly applauded throughout the world. The month of June has ‘Trooping the Colour’ on Horse Guard’s Parade followed by a military fly-past and the traditional appearance by the Royal family on the Buckingham Palace balcony. The birthday honours list is also published at this time.
Because this year is so significant – the Queen having become the longest-serving British monarch of all time – we too are encouraged to have local events and parties and to join in a national weekend of celebration.
In King’s Lynn we have ‘Celebrate King’s Lynn’ – a free, full day event of activities.

In our benefice, we are having a barbeque at St. Botolph’s Church, Grimston on Saturday 11th starting at 4pm. Tickets are £5 – do come along and enjoy a lovely summer evening.
What better reason for a party?
Our beloved Queen offers us the perfect model of enduring public service and inspirational leadership, underpinned by strong Christian faith. She writes: “For me the teachings of Christ and my personal accountability before God provide a framework in which I try to live my life.” We could do well to follow her example.
Let us all join in wishing Her Majesty a very Happy Official Birthday: hip hip hooray!
Reverend Judith


To Brexit or not to Brexit? – that is the question!
Our votes (yours and mine) as we go to the Polls next month to decide whether the UK wishes to remain a member of the European Union will probably be the most important vote we will make at the polls in our life time. It will affect all of us.
The stay in crowd say:
Jobs We maintain trade relations with the continent and thereby secure jobs.
National Security “It is through the EU that we exchange criminal records and passen-ger records and work together on counter-terrorism,”
National Financial Impact The UK’s status as one of the world’s biggest financial cen-tres will be diminished if it is no longer seen as a gateway to the EU for the likes of US banks,
BUT the get out crowd say:
Jobs Control of our own borders means we decide how many immigrants come to the UK – limit the numbers coming in and there will be more jobs available for those al-ready here.
National Security Unless we get out we leave the “door open” to terrorist attacks. Open borders do not allow us to check and control people.
National Financial Impact Free from EU rules and regulations Britain could reinvent itself AND there would be an immediate cost saving, as the country would no longer contribute to the EU budget (£13bn)
These are just some of the arguments. None of the above statements tells the full story by any means but you can see my dilemma as there seems to be equally good arguments on both sides of the campaign – so who to believe and who is right? What to do?
I’ve been pondering this conundrum and there is a big part of me, as a Christian, that says –stay with our friends in Europe; we are better, stronger together and surely we should aim to be an inclusive nation, welcoming and willing to work with our brothers and sisters across our borders in fellowship and love. Together we can form policies and friendships that benefit everyone and are a beacon of light in the world. After all (on a much smaller scale admittedly) that is what our group of ten churches are aiming to do here – to see ourselves as one body of faithful people who help each other, work to-gether, pray together, worship together and reach out together to our communities with God’s love. We are about taking away boundaries – not putting them up.
But then someone remarked to me that if the EU were embedded in Christian Values that would be fine but sadly it more often seems to be about grabbing at power and the self-ish aims of individuals or individual nations.
So where does this leave us? To Brexit or not to Brexit? For me that is still the BIG question! I shall now go off into a quiet room to pray about it and hope to hear God’s still small voice guiding my hand as I place my X.


“April is the cruellest month breeding lilacs out of a dead land…” The poet TS Eliot was referring to the annual resurgence of new life in Spring – which will only die once more when its time comes, hence the cruelty: the annual cycle always leads to death. But this is a bleak way of seeing the world.

As Christians we know that in Spring-time, each Easter-tide, we can bear witness to the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ, the life-blood which invigorates and sustains our churches throughout the year. Our Christian faith is nourished by the life-giving power of God in Christ Jesus, who gives us hope that will never die; the power of the Holy Spirit is always at work in all our lives. April is, in fact, the most joyful month – and the season of Easter-tide lasts all month.
As a former city-dweller, I really appreciate the joy of rural life and being surrounded by the natural beauty of the countryside in Spring. I was at an RSPB reserve last week and saw the reed beds quivering with new bird-life. In our villages, the toad patrols are on high alert near our wonderful ponds, as toads emerge from hibernation for their spring migration to breed where they were born.
Gardeners too are stirring in their potting sheds, planning for the year ahead. Our lawnmower has been dusted off but during its annual service it gave up the ghost so investing in a new mower became a priority. We decided against a self-propelled one in case it ran away from us and attacked Rufus, always at our heels, but we have gone for the best petrol engine we could afford, an investment in many happy years of mowing to come!
With Easter falling early this year we can now enjoy a leisurely stroll towards late Spring and Summer as we welcome the new influx of visitors to our beautiful county, passing through our villages and churches. Springtime activity in churches is similar to that of gardening: dusting off the produce stall and trying to summon up new energy for
fundraising as well as doing a bit of spring-cleaning. If you have ever thought of getting a bit more involved in Church life, now is the perfect time – we really do need your help and support. Have a word with one of the churchwardens or myself. Do come and join us for our Sunday services, especially as the weather gets warmer!
Happy Spring-cleaning, Happy Gardening! Most of all Happy Easter-tide!   Reverend Judith


March is a Funny Month!

Not funny ha ha but an odd mix of highs and lows and contrasting emotions as we travel in our hearts with Christ on his journey to Jerusalem. There is deep personal reflection (for those of us who take Lent seriously); then, later in the month, we feel the pain and passion of Holy week as we remember Christ’s suffering humiliation and death on the cross. And then, in complete contrast again, the joyful celebration of Easter day and resurrection.

What’s even odder is that, in the midst of this journey toward and then celebrating Easter, the story is broken into on the fourth Sunday of Lent (this year 6th March) as it is always kept as Mothering Sunday – a day when Mothering in all its forms is celebrated. So, within the church, March will bring a mixture of emotions, highs and lows – serious reflection, sadness and indeed joy. Bit like life really!

Thinking about mothering – The list of characteristics associated with mothering is long and varied. We could say those who ‘mother’ us are determined, protective, nurturing, passionate, generous, sacrificial, brave, joyful, trusting and faithful and ever present, even in sorrow, grieving and caring. Mothering demonstrates a love that is stronger than death. We call God ‘Our Father’ – we could equally say ‘our mother’ (Jesus’s) wept tears over the people of Jerusalem ‘as a mother weeps for her children, longing to gather them like a hen gathers her chicks.’ A ‘love stronger than death’ is also a description of God’s love for us.

We all yearn to be mothered don’t we? Without someone to look out for our interests, to defend us, to protect us; to enable us to learn our purpose in life, without someone to model trust, faith, and joy; without someone who will love us enough to let us go our own way; without someone to take the risk of loving us, even knowing that that love may bring them pain; without someone to stand with us in our times of greatest suffering – without someone to do those things for us, we are missing something crucial. And if we ourselves have nobody for whom we can do these things, we are also missing out.

As we think about our own lives, our experiences of mothering or of being mothered, we remember with thanksgiving the people who have done those things for us. And that might well include people other than our birth mothers, for mothering is not only done by mothers – we can all do mothering! On the cross, God’s love is nailed firmly to the world so as never to let it go. A truly parental love is one that would give anything and everything for the child. This is the love of God that we see on the cross but this is also the love that we are called to have for one another and for all of God’s creation.

When we love like that, we make our Mothering-God visible in the world. Happy Mothering Sunday, and a Very Happy Easter. Much Love, Revd Jane


Message to all Parishioners February 2016

 Spring into Action – it’s only Lent again! We Brits like stability, don’t we? We know where we are with Christmas – every year the same, December 25th. But as for Easter, well it moves around all over the place. In the Church we call it ‘a moveable feast’. It makes for huge complexity when planning ahead in business or education, for example. Easter is really early this year; the start of Lent, Ash Wednesday, is on February 10th, even before Valentine’s Day. However, the Archbishops have now decided that Easter should come into line with the Eastern Christian Church and, in the future, have the same date every year. This will take 5-10 years to accomplish. So all we will have to contend with is the clocks going back – and forward – as they will on 23rd March 2016 – which this year just happens to be Easter Sunday. Funny old world, isn’t it?

Lent is the traditional time to give up something we enjoy (forgo chocolate?) and in doing so ‘hope-fully’ become more appreciative of the pleasures of life when they are reinstated at Easter, forty days later. Or we can take something on – a course of study perhaps? Lifelong learning has been described as the interaction between our experience (good and bad) and our personal development. Lent Courses are a popular feature of this season of the Church year and a great opportunity to dip one’s toe into the water. This year we are running the same course at each end of our benefice (group of churches) on different evenings. We will be exploring together ‘Not a Tame Lion’ by Hilary Brand, a short course based on the writings of CS Lewis. Please see our website for further details – or ask a member of the team. We have now passed the first anniversary of our new benefice: the Gayton, Grimston, Massingham and District Group of churches over ten different villages. Please check out our exciting new website: www.ggmbenefice.uk

We are fortunate in having several groups that meet together regularly for prayer and Bible study. We hope to build on this foundation over the coming months and offer other courses which could, if desired, lead to confirmation. Please be in touch if this is of interest to you.

I wish you a blessed and rewarding Lent.

Reverend Judith

PLEASE NOTE :  The Lent course at Massingham is kindly being hosted by Kim and Allan Frazer at Cobwebs, Great Massingham on Mondays, starting on 15th February at 7.30pm


St. Mary’s Great Massingham

Although the parish is mentioned in the Domesday Commissioners’ report of 1086, no reference is made to a church or priest. Less than 100 years later there were two churches in the village, St Mary’s and All Saints. (No sign of All Saints now!) St Mary’s represented the focal point of village life for hundreds of years, being used for various meetings other than religious occasions. For example the porch, added around 1300, was used as a school room. Sir Robert Walpole, England’s first Prime Minister in 1720 is thought to have been educated in this porch as a young boy. His descendants still live in Houghton Hall,  3 miles to the north.

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The great square tower of St. Mary’s Church, built in the 15th century, is a structure with diagonal buttresses tapering up in four stages to the battlements and corner pinnacles. It houses four bells, three of which were re-cast in 1903. The outstanding architectural feature of the church is its 13th century porch. The high entrance arch is supported by a pair of polygonal buttresses. Visitors then walk between six pairs of fine lancet windows, and then enter the church through a doorway of the same period as the porch.

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The church interior has several notable features, most striking is the exceptionally tall arch under the tower at the west end of the nave. The apex of this arch is about half the height of the tower itself. Other features include the 14th century font, the very old coats of arms painted high on the clerestory walls, the unused door to the rood loft high up in the north wall of the chancel, and the 15th century painted glass in the south windows of the chancel. The figures were decapitated by the Puritans in the 16th century, however the symbols carried by the figures indicate that they are eight of the Apostles.

Memorials in St. Mary’s Graveyard and Church

Massingham Churches are in the Benefice of The Gayton, Grimston and Great Massingham & District Benefice.

For further information please go to the benefice website – www.ggmbenefice.uk

Team Rector is: The Rev Jane Holmes: 01553 636227

Team Vicar is : The Rev. Judith Pollard: 01485 601251

There is an active bell ringing group – Tower Captain: Denys Winner: Phone No: 01485 520598



 

St Andrew’s is the parish church of Little Massingham, just to the north of Great Massingham. Is said to be one of the prettiest churches in the area, the  white and greys of the flint setting off the pattern of old red bricks. The red bricks in the south clerestory wall are pieces of red chalk quarried near Hunstanton on the North Norfolk Coast.

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The 15th century porch has panels of flint flush work on either side of the entrance. Much of the remainder of the church is 14th century, but a blocked window in the north wall of the chancel is thought to be Norman. The Domesday Survey says that the two Massinghams were already separate and distinct communities, so it is likely that the Normans built a stone church at Little Massingham to replace a wooden Saxon church, just as they did in many other places.

The tomb under the tower is the burial place of Sir John L’ Estrange (d1517) and his wife Margaret. It is of grey marble, and has holes for the rivets that once secured brass effigies of the couple and other brass ornamentation. Initially sited in the south-east corner of the nave, then later moved and sunk flush with the floor near the pulpit. It was moved to its present position in 1857 when the floor was tiled. The Victorian pulpit by Thomas Jekyll dates from the same year. The squint (or hagioscope) was cut at an angle through the wall by the chancel arch in medieval times, so that the priest officiating at the Lady Chapel altar could watch and keep in time with the Rector at the main Altar in the chancel.

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