Biodiversity Project

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Biodiversity Project – next working party will be on Saturday the 8th of July

 The next working party will be on Saturday 8th July meeting at the biodiversity site off the Weasenham Road at about 10 am.

As usual, there will be a mid-morning break for tea/coffee and biscuits. A major task will be to clear the bonfire site at the west end of the wood and prepare it for sowing a range of under-storey species, including foxgloves and white campion. A small area in the wild flower meadow will also need to be prepared for seeding with yellow rattle.

New members will be especially welcome. Gardening gloves and strong shoes are recommended and a rake or fork would also be helpful.

The photograph shows the extensive re-greening of the north side of the pond that has followed the wintertime excavation and enlargement of the pond.

Notable on closer inspection are crowded seedlings of starwort, a floating aquatic with rosetted leaves.


Biodiversity Group – next working party Saturday 10th of May 

The next working party will be on Saturday 10th May at the biodiversity site from about 10 am with a break for tea/coffee and biscuits at 11 am. We plan to rake over the spoil deposited during pond renovations and sow with a mixture of wet-pasture species. The viewing platform and bridge still need a spruce-up and there is a need to burn some of the woody material accumulated from clearing scrub etc. As always, new members are especially welcome. Gardening gloves and sensible shoes are recommended and a rake or fork would be useful but not essential.

Mike Jackson (01485 520 056)


Biodiversity Group – next working party April 8th

 

The next working party will be on Saturday 8th  April at the biodiversity site on the Weasenham Road, starting at about 10 am. In addition to general maintenance, woody brush from the recent pond clearance needs collecting up and burning and the viewing platform and bridge could do with cleaning. There will be tea, coffee and biscuits at 11 am. New members especially are assured of a very warm welcome.  Gardening gloves are recommended and a rake, fork would be useful but not essential.

Mike Jackson (01485 520 056)



Biodiversity Project – Progress at School Pond

 


                                                                                     After                  Before

 

 

 

 

 

You may recall that, thanks to those who supported us recently by voting on-line, the Skipton Building Society awarded £500 to help renovate School Pond. This, together with a matching grant from the Parish Council, has allowed us to engage a contractor to remove invasive willow trees and Norfolk reed along with many years-worth of accumulated silt and soft mud.

Our Borough Council has statutory oversight for the Great Massingham Conservation Area and its approval was given in time for most of the work to be done during February. Experts at the Norfolk Wildlife Trust have guided the operation throughout and the outcome has been an area of open water about three times larger than before (see photos) and a much-increased water holding capacity.

The size is now close to what we believe to be the original.  An unavoidable expanse of exposed mud is unsightly at present but this should soon be masked by fresh vegetation. Much of the woody material from the pond has already been disposed of and the rest will be dealt with in the coming weeks. Some of this material will be used to create habitat for invertebrates and fungi etc.

Our first working party for 2017 will be on Saturday 11th March, starting at about 10 am with a break for tea `or coffee mid-morning. An important task will be to prepare part of the wild flower meadow for re-sowing. Please join us!

 

Mike Jackson (Tel: 520 056)


Biodiversity Project Thank you for your votes in the October issue of The Mallard, readers were asked to vote online in support our application for a grant from the Skipton Building Society to renovate School Pond. We were already on a short-list but needed lots of votes to secure a grant. The response was magnificent and sufficient to qualify us for a £500 donation. Grateful thanks to everyone who voted for us. To add to the good news, the Parish Council has since agreed match the Skipton grant. Thanks to the Council’s generosity, we now have enough to pay a contractor to extract extensive tree roots from the pond, remove some of the Norfolk reed and dig-out much accumulated silt and mud. The work will restore the pond to approximately its original size and create gently sloping banks needed to encourage plant life and aid the movement of toads and other amphibians. The online votes cast in our favour and the generosity of our Parish Council should soon make these much-needed improvements a reality. Thank you to everyone who has supported us. If you would like to join our group of volunteers and help maintain the biodiversity site you are welcome at our next meeting on December 14th at 6.30 pm for pre-Christmas discussions, food and drinks. If you plan to come, please ring 520 056 to let me know by Sunday 11th December. Mike Jackson, 01485 520 056


VOTE NOW !

The Project is seeking a grant from the Skipton Building society’s “grassroots giving” scheme to help fund further work on the site at Sandy Lane.  We have been placed on the short-list of 376 out of the original 730 applications.  However to secure the grant of £500 we now need sufficient votes from the general public to place us in the top 163.
Instructions on how to vote:
Please go to the ‘Grassroots Giving’ web site: https://www.skiptongrg.co.uk/ and click on the large ‘Voting Now Open’ icon. Then, click on ‘East of England’ and then click on project number 6  Great Massingham Biodiversity Project. Its quick and simple.
Closing date is 18th of October
Next working party is on Saturday 8th of October from around 10.00am at the Sandy Lane site.

Mike Jackson

 biodiversity

Great Massingham Biodiversity Project

Volunteers turn unloved corner of village into haven for wildlife.

Group introduction

Great Massingham is a Norfolk village of about 1000 people set in an area of intensive arable farming that no longer sustains the diverse flora and forna of earlier times. To help counter this decline, a hitherto neglected part of the village (about 2.5 acres) is being renovated to create a species-diverse woodland, meadow and pond area that is attractive, informative and encourages local people to take responsibility for their natural environment.

The site is run by a group of 16 volunteers who meet regularly to maintain and develop the site and enhance their own knowledge and interest in local wildlife. The site is proving useful to the nearby primary school for nature studies. The wood, and wildflower meadow areas have recently been linked by an all-weather path, making the site a popular and informative walk for local residents of all ages (including wheelchair and pushchair users). Talks and articles in the village newsletter raise interest in the Project and the local environment more generally.

How would this funding have an impact on your community?

A prominent feature of the Biodiversity Site is a sizeable pond that holds much promise for encouraging diverse plant and animal life. However, at present it is clogged by willow trees and Norfolk reed. Removing these invasive species to create open water and a perimeter suitable for wetland plants, newts, toads, dragon flies etc., is beyond the physical capability of our volunteers. The work requires specialist outside help. A £500 grant from the Grassroots Giving Team would pay for outside contractor to remove the trees and reeds. Once the earthworks are completed, our volunteers would introduce aquatic and marginal plants chosen with guidance from a Norfolk County Council ecologist. When completed, visitors will enjoy a diverse range of aquatic plant and animal life to add to that contained in adjacent meadow and woodland areas.

The appeal and benefit to our village (1000 residents) can be expected to last for many years and offer the opportunity for future generations of local people to engage in a practical way with caring for local wild life. The site lies 250 metres from the local primary school and acts as an outside classroom for biology lessons.

“The Great Massingham Biodiversity group is steadily transforming a once neglected and unloved area of the village into an attractive and varied nature reserve that can be enjoyed by everyone thanks to its central position and to the its easy-access pathways. The planned overhaul of the pond area will add considerably to the appeal of the overall biodiversity site and create a valued asset for our village that will also be useful to the nearby school . The assistance you may be able to give through your Grassroots Giving Scheme will be most gratefully received by the Village.

Geoffrey Randall, Chair Norfolk Wildlife Trust Local Members Group and Trustee of the Norfolk Wildlife Trust. Beverley Randall, Chair of the Governors of Great Massingham and Harpley Church of England Schools Federation.”

                           

 


There will be a working party at the biodiversity site on Weasenham Road on Saturday 14th May, starting at 10 am. We hope as many people as possible will come and help us keep the meadow, wood and pond areas up to scratch.

A three-part guided tour of the Pensthorpe Natural Park is planned for Tues-day 24th May with a few places still available. If you want to join us, please call me as soon as possible on 520 056. The Biodiversity Project had planned to open the garden at Long Barn, Kennels Farm on 26th June but the date will now be Sunday 19th June to be part of the Parish Council’s village open gardens. We’ll have tea, cake, strawberries & cream etc and plants for sale. Please include us in your garden tour! Mike Jackson

New recruits to the project and old hands will be most welcome. Gardening gloves and a rake and hand fork are helpful but not essential.
Mike Jackson


 

Much good work was done on our biodiversity site last year and the range of established plants has continued to expand.

The number of species logged has now reached 126. This will increase further following an extensive planting of the woodland fern Polystichum setiferum (the Soft Shield Fern) in April. It will also soon be time for our first working party of the year.

This has been arranged for Saturday 12th March starting at about 10 am at the site off the Weasenham Road. If you are free that morning please join us. You will be very welcome. The first jobs will be removing the piles of hay that have overwintered on the wildflower meadow, attending to the recently planted blue bell area and to the intended site for the ferns plus some general post-winter clearing of paths and margins. A rake and a garden fork would be helpful but not essential.

There will be a tea and coffee break at about eleven o’clock (see photograph below). For the past two years we have held an open garden day to help raise funds for new plants etc.

These have proved enjoyable occasions and on Sunday 26th June this year, the garden at Long Barn, Kennels Farm will be open to visitors in aid of the Project.

More details will follow nearer the time.

Mike Jackson

James Amos
Langham Glass
James Johnson
Frost to Hot Heating
Karl Andrews
Distinct DESIGNS UK